Research: An introduction / MLA Citation: Rules and Guidelines

A Presentation at Seneca College for EAP 500 students

RESEARCH: An introduction

Why is research important?

  • “Standing on the shoulders of giants”

How do we evaluate sources?

  • Accuracy & Reputation

Why do we cite?

  • Intellectual property
  • “Trail” of knowledge

MLA CITATION: Rules and Guidelines

The Modern Language Association (MLA) citation and format style is used in the disciplines of Humanities.

EVALUATING SOURCES:

Valid

Not Valid

Books

Wikipedia

Major   newspapers (print & online)

Other   encyclopedias

Peer-reviewed   journals

Personal   Websites (blogs)

Websites   with extensions .edu or .org

Websites   that are not official

1)      BOOKS:

  • Author’s name
  • Title of the book
  • Edition of the book (if it is not the first)
  • Place of Publication
  • Publisher
  • Year of Publication
  • Medium of publication (Print or Web)

Lastname, Firstname. Title of Book. City of Publication: Publisher, Year of Publication. Medium of Publication.

2)      WEBSITES:

  • Author and/or editor names (if available)
  • Article name in quotation marks (if applicable)
  • Title of the Website, project, or book in italics.
  • Any version numbers available, including revisions, posting dates, volumes, or issue numbers.
  • Publisher information, including the publisher name and publishing date.
  • Take note of any page numbers (if available).
  • Medium of publication.
  • Date you accessed the material.
  • URL (if required, or for your own personal reference; MLA does not require a URL).

Editor, author, or compiler name (if available). Name of Site. Version number.

Name of institution/organization affiliated with the site (sponsor or publisher), date of resource creation (if available). Medium of publication. Date of access.

Newspaper Article

Author(s). “Title of Article.” Title of Periodical Day Month Year: pages. Medium of publication.

Formatting

First Page:

  • Do not make a title page for your paper unless specifically requested.
  • In the upper left-hand corner of the first page, list your name, your instructor’s name, the course, and the date.
  • Double space again and center the title. Do not underline, italicize, or place your title in quotation marks; write the title in Title Case (standard capitalization), not in all capital letters.

In the Text:

  • Use quotation marks and/or italics when referring to other works in your title, just as you would in your text: Exploring the theme of “affordability” in Michael Pollan’s In Defense of Food.
  • When paraphrasing or summarizing another author’s idea, indicate the author’s name as well as the page number where the idea was found in brackets:

Ex1: City dwellers purchase their foods from supermarkets. However, supermarkets are selling more and more items that are not ‘real’ food but rather “food-like products” (Pollan, 13).

Ex2: City dwellers purchase their foods from supermarkets. According to Michael Pollan, however, many items sold in supermarkets are not real food but are rather “food-like” products (13).

How to Imbed Quotations

Michael Pollan argues, “______________________________________”.

Example: Michael Pollan argues, “nutritionism tends to foster a great deal of anxiety around the experience of shopping for food and eating it” (53).

According to Michael Pollan, “_______________________________”.

Example: According to Michael Pollan, “nutritionism [leads to] a great deal of anxiety around the experience of shopping for food and eating it” (53).

– “__________________________________”, according to Michael Pollan. (or argues Michael Pollan).

“Nutritionism [causes] a great deal of anxiety around the experience of shopping for food and eating it”, according to Michael Pollan (53).

Checkov’s character states, “__________________________________________”.

Example: Checkov’s character states, “I dress in black to match my life. I am unhappy” (1).

– Moira Farr claims,  “______________________________________________”.

Example: Moira Farr (argues, claims, contends, insists) “our troubles now are those of overexposure, of too much communication that is unimportant, and too little of what truly is”.

  • Never have a quotation stand as its own complete sentence.
  • Remember, the quotation must fit into the grammatical structure of your own sentence!

Wrong: In Omnivore’s Dilemma Michael Pollan’s argument is that “Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants”.

Wrong: Moira Farr’s argument “our troubles now are those of overexposure”.

  • Two rules for your Work Cited:  Alphabetize and Indent.

Work Cited

Earth Hour – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Web. Accessed on March 17, 2012.

MLA Works Cited Page: Books. The Purdue OWL. Purdue U Writing Lab, 2010. Web.  Accessed on March 17, 2012. <http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/06/>.

Pollan, Michael. In Defense of Food: An Eater’s Manifesto. New York: Penguin, 2008. Print.

The Purdue OWL. Purdue U Writing Lab, 2010. Web. Accessed on March 8, 2012.

York University News & Events. York University. 2012. Web. Accessed on March 17, 2012.

Once you’ve mastered the art of citing, you can use this little helper: http://www.easybib.com/

Advertisements

Internet Witch-hunt (EAP500 Oral Presentation)

A presentation by Harry Baek (April 11th, 2012)

[Introduction to My Topic]

Hello, Everyone. My name is Harry. I am going to talk about “Internet Witch-hunt”. It is a major problem in Korea. I chose this topic because not only was I surprised with the “Internet witch-hunt” situation, but also I want to give a message to Internet users who leave offensive comments on the Internet. I hope that my presentation will make our world a better place.

[Outline of My Presentation]

This is outline of my presentation. I am using an essay style for my presentation, so my presentation is divided into three main parts. Introduction and give three examples: Public Criticism, Disclosure of Personal Information, and False Morality that result in Internet witch-hunt. Finally, I will explain how serious the “witch-hunt” situation is then I will suggest some solutions in conclusion.

[Introduction]

“Witch-hunt” is a phenomenon that is receiving more and more attention on the Korean Internet. In this witch-hunt, Internet users start to dig up personal information and spread it over the Internet with the intent of hurting the reputation or feelings. Often the information gets twisted, exaggerated in order to make the rumor more damaging. The three factors that result in “with-hunt” situations are public criticism, disclosure of personal information, and false morality.

[Body 1]

[Case 1: Public Criticism]

The first problem, which causes the “Internet witch-hunt”, is public criticism. To explain it, I need to describe the “Soup-girl (Korean: Guk-Mul-nyeo)” case in Korea. “Soup-girl” name given by South Korean bloggers to a woman who hurt a child in a restaurant. The child’s mother posted this story on the Internet website. The story spread quickly through the Internet and other netizens were forwarding the information to more people or joining the “witch-hunt”. Soon many Internet users strongly blamed the “Soup-girl” and left negative comments about her. Within days, the truth came out through CCTV (Closed-circuit television). The Internet users, who blamed the “Soup-girl”, started to blame the child’s mother. This case became one of the most famous examples “Internet witch-hunt” in Korea.

[Body 2]

[Case 2: Disclosure of Personal Information]

The second case is disclosure of personal information. The “Dog-poop-girl” case refers to name given by Internet users to a woman who refused to clean up when her dog defecated in a subway car. One of the subway riders took photographs of the incident with a digital camera and posted it on a popular website. Soon Internet users were observing the picture in order to prove the woman’s identity, and within days, she had been identified and much of her personal information was being exposed on the Internet in order to punish her for the offense. The girl is the victim because netizens invaded her personal privacy and it will affect her life negatively for a long time.

[Body 3]

[Case 3: False Morality]

Finally, the false morality, which results in Internet witch-hunt, causes an abuse of human rights. This is one example about false morality. Stephanie and her husband went to Boners BBQ in Atlanta for a meal. They leave the review on Yelp. After seeing the Yelp review, the person who worked for Boners BBQ told “she didn’t tip the server” and he decided to put her picture with negative comments and many people copied the picture and comments for fun. She became a laughing-stock. However, The Stephanie actually, DID leave a tip, 20% on the table. When the restaurant owner knows the truth, he wanted to compensate her by money. The money cannot compensate the mental damage.

[Conclusion]

One of the most damaging effects is that a victim begins to avoid friends and activities, which is often the very intention of the cyber-bully. It is easy to hide one’s true identity.  In recent years, the witch-hunt situation leads to tragic outcomes such as the victims committing suicide or suffering from severe depression. The Internet witch-hunt resulted in tragic results. The famous actresses in Korea, Da-bin Jeong and Jin-sil Choi, singer Yuni, they eventually committed suicide. Remember that you could make a real difference to someone’s life by one comment. Think before you leave a comment.

SOURCE

[Refer to the Thesis]

조아라. 2011. ‘사이버 공간에서의 악성댓글 사용에 대한 탐색적 연구’. 한국청소년 상담원

[Online Newspaper]

권혁기기자. 악플에 상처 받는 연예인들, 누리꾼 의식 개선 ‘절실’ TV리포트 <2011>

(http://www.tvreport.co.kr/?c=news&m=newsview&idx=121404)

정슴임기자. 비방 글 네티즌 11명 검거”페미니스트 집단” “수류탄…”. 한국일보.<2011>

(http://news.hankooki.com/lpage/society/201112/h2011121702311421950.htm)

[Searching Data]

(N.D), Naver, Encyclopedia

(http://100.naver.com/100.nhn?docid=58049)

(N.D), Wiki Encyclopedia

(http://ko.wikipedia.org/wiki/%EB%A7%88%EB%85%80%EC%82%AC%EB%83%A5)

(N.D), Wikipedia

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_vigilantism)

초이, 2012/03/05, Personal Blog

(http://blog.naver.com/sainie0222?Redirect=Log&logNo=130133110540)

Online Dictionary

(http://dictionary.reverso.net/english-cobuild/witch-hunt)

(N.D) January 10, 2012, Worst Use Of Social Media Article

(http://www.unmarketing.com/2012/01/10/worst-use-of-social-media-of-2012-boners-bbq/)

(N.D) Feb 28, 2012, The source of the photo and video

(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5uHkZAg20ds)

Internet Witch-hunt (EAP500 Oral Presentation)

A presentation by Harry Baek (APR 11, 2012)

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The Tell-tale Heart – Edgar Allan Poe (1843)

TRUE! –nervous –very, very dreadfully nervous I had been and am; but why will you say that I am mad? The disease had sharpened my senses –not destroyed –not dulled them. Above all was the sense of hearing acute. I heard all things in the heaven and in the earth. I heard many things in hell. How, then, am I mad? Hearken! and observe how healthily –how calmly I can tell you the whole story.

It is impossible to say how first the idea entered my brain; but once conceived, it haunted me day and night. Object there was none. Passion there was none. I loved the old man. He had never wronged me. He had never given me insult. For his gold I had no desire. I think it was his eye! yes, it was this! He had the eye of a vulture –a pale blue eye, with a film over it. Whenever it fell upon me, my blood ran cold; and so by degrees –very gradually –I made up my mind to take the life of the old man, and thus rid myself of the eye forever.

Now this is the point. You fancy me mad. Madmen know nothing. But you should have seen me. You should have seen how wisely I proceeded –with what caution –with what foresight –with what dissimulation I went to work! I was never kinder to the old man than during the whole week before I killed him. And every night, about midnight, I turned the latch of his door and opened it –oh so gently! And then, when I had made an opening sufficient for my head, I put in a dark lantern, all closed, closed, that no light shone out, and then I thrust in my head. Oh, you would have laughed to see how cunningly I thrust it in! I moved it slowly –very, very slowly, so that I might not disturb the old man’s sleep. It took me an hour to place my whole head within the opening so far that I could see him as he lay upon his bed. Ha! would a madman have been so wise as this, And then, when my head was well in the room, I undid the lantern cautiously-oh, so cautiously –cautiously (for the hinges creaked) –I undid it just so much that a single thin ray fell upon the vulture eye. And this I did for seven long nights –every night just at midnight –but I found the eye always closed; and so it was impossible to do the work; for it was not the old man who vexed me, but his Evil Eye. And every morning, when the day broke, I went boldly into the chamber, and spoke courageously to him, calling him by name in a hearty tone, and inquiring how he has passed the night. So you see he would have been a very profound old man, indeed, to suspect that every night, just at twelve, I looked in upon him while he slept.

Upon the eighth night I was more than usually cautious in opening the door. A watch’s minute hand moves more quickly than did mine. Never before that night had I felt the extent of my own powers –of my sagacity. I could scarcely contain my feelings of triumph. To think that there I was, opening the door, little by little, and he not even to dream of my secret deeds or thoughts. I fairly chuckled at the idea; and perhaps he heard me; for he moved on the bed suddenly, as if startled. Now you may think that I drew back –but no. His room was as black as pitch with the thick darkness, (for the shutters were close fastened, through fear of robbers,) and so I knew that he could not see the opening of the door, and I kept pushing it on steadily, steadily.

I had my head in, and was about to open the lantern, when my thumb slipped upon the tin fastening, and the old man sprang up in bed, crying out –“Who’s there?”

I kept quite still and said nothing. For a whole hour I did not move a muscle, and in the meantime I did not hear him lie down. He was still sitting up in the bed listening; –just as I have done, night after night, hearkening to the death watches in the wall.

Presently I heard a slight groan, and I knew it was the groan of mortal terror. It was not a groan of pain or of grief –oh, no! –it was the low stifled sound that arises from the bottom of the soul when overcharged with awe. I knew the sound well. Many a night, just at midnight, when all the world slept, it has welled up from my own bosom, deepening, with its dreadful echo, the terrors that distracted me. I say I knew it well. I knew what the old man felt, and pitied him, although I chuckled at heart. I knew that he had been lying awake ever since the first slight noise, when he had turned in the bed. His fears had been ever since growing upon him. He had been trying to fancy them causeless, but could not. He had been saying to himself –“It is nothing but the wind in the chimney –it is only a mouse crossing the floor,” or “It is merely a cricket which has made a single chirp.” Yes, he had been trying to comfort himself with these suppositions: but he had found all in vain. All in vain; because Death, in approaching him had stalked with his black shadow before him, and enveloped the victim. And it was the mournful influence of the unperceived shadow that caused him to feel –although he neither saw nor heard –to feel the presence of my head within the room.

When I had waited a long time, very patiently, without hearing him lie down, I resolved to open a little –a very, very little crevice in the lantern. So I opened it –you cannot imagine how stealthily, stealthily –until, at length a simple dim ray, like the thread of the spider, shot from out the crevice and fell full upon the vulture eye.

It was open –wide, wide open –and I grew furious as I gazed upon it. I saw it with perfect distinctness –all a dull blue, with a hideous veil over it that chilled the very marrow in my bones; but I could see nothing else of the old man’s face or person: for I had directed the ray as if by instinct, precisely upon the damned spot.

And have I not told you that what you mistake for madness is but over-acuteness of the sense? –now, I say, there came to my ears a low, dull, quick sound, such as a watch makes when enveloped in cotton. I knew that sound well, too. It was the beating of the old man’s heart. It increased my fury, as the beating of a drum stimulates the soldier into courage.

But even yet I refrained and kept still. I scarcely breathed. I held the lantern motionless. I tried how steadily I could maintain the ray upon the eve. Meantime the hellish tattoo of the heart increased. It grew quicker and quicker, and louder and louder every instant. The old man’s terror must have been extreme! It grew louder, I say, louder every moment! –do you mark me well I have told you that I am nervous: so I am. And now at the dead hour of the night, amid the dreadful silence of that old house, so strange a noise as this excited me to uncontrollable terror. Yet, for some minutes longer I refrained and stood still. But the beating grew louder, louder! I thought the heart must burst. And now a new anxiety seized me –the sound would be heard by a neighbour! The old man’s hour had come! With a loud yell, I threw open the lantern and leaped into the room. He shrieked once –once only. In an instant I dragged him to the floor, and pulled the heavy bed over him. I then smiled gaily, to find the deed so far done. But, for many minutes, the heart beat on with a muffled sound. This, however, did not vex me; it would not be heard through the wall. At length it ceased. The old man was dead. I removed the bed and examined the corpse. Yes, he was stone, stone dead. I placed my hand upon the heart and held it there many minutes. There was no pulsation. He was stone dead. His eve would trouble me no more.

If still you think me mad, you will think so no longer when I describe the wise precautions I took for the concealment of the body. The night waned, and I worked hastily, but in silence. First of all I dismembered the corpse. I cut off the head and the arms and the legs.

I then took up three planks from the flooring of the chamber, and deposited all between the scantlings. I then replaced the boards so cleverly, so cunningly, that no human eye –not even his –could have detected any thing wrong. There was nothing to wash out –no stain of any kind –no blood-spot whatever. I had been too wary for that. A tub had caught all –ha! ha!

When I had made an end of these labors, it was four o’clock –still dark as midnight. As the bell sounded the hour, there came a knocking at the street door. I went down to open it with a light heart, –for what had I now to fear? There entered three men, who introduced themselves, with perfect suavity, as officers of the police. A shriek had been heard by a neighbour during the night; suspicion of foul play had been aroused; information had been lodged at the police office, and they (the officers) had been deputed to search the premises.

I smiled, –for what had I to fear? I bade the gentlemen welcome. The shriek, I said, was my own in a dream. The old man, I mentioned, was absent in the country. I took my visitors all over the house. I bade them search –search well. I led them, at length, to his chamber. I showed them his treasures, secure, undisturbed. In the enthusiasm of my confidence, I brought chairs into the room, and desired them here to rest from their fatigues, while I myself, in the wild audacity of my perfect triumph, placed my own seat upon the very spot beneath which reposed the corpse of the victim.

The officers were satisfied. My manner had convinced them. I was singularly at ease. They sat, and while I answered cheerily, they chatted of familiar things. But, ere long, I felt myself getting pale and wished them gone. My head ached, and I fancied a ringing in my ears: but still they sat and still chatted. The ringing became more distinct: –It continued and became more distinct: I talked more freely to get rid of the feeling: but it continued and gained definiteness –until, at length, I found that the noise was not within my ears.

No doubt I now grew very pale; –but I talked more fluently, and with a heightened voice. Yet the sound increased –and what could I do? It was a low, dull, quick sound –much such a sound as a watch makes when enveloped in cotton. I gasped for breath –and yet the officers heard it not. I talked more quickly –more vehemently; but the noise steadily increased. I arose and argued about trifles, in a high key and with violent gesticulations; but the noise steadily increased. Why would they not be gone? I paced the floor to and fro with heavy strides, as if excited to fury by the observations of the men –but the noise steadily increased. Oh God! what could I do? I foamed –I raved –I swore! I swung the chair upon which I had been sitting, and grated it upon the boards, but the noise arose over all and continually increased. It grew louder –louder –louder! And still the men chatted pleasantly, and smiled. Was it possible they heard not? Almighty God! –no, no! They heard! –they suspected! –they knew! –they were making a mockery of my horror!-this I thought, and this I think. But anything was better than this agony! Anything was more tolerable than this derision! I could bear those hypocritical smiles no longer! I felt that I must scream or die! and now –again! –hark! louder! louder! louder! louder!

“Villains!” I shrieked, “dissemble no more! I admit the deed! –tear up the planks! here, here! –It is the beating of his hideous heart!”

The source of article : http://xroads.virginia.edu/~hyper/poe/telltale.html

The Jewelry – Guy de Maupassant

Monsieur Lantin had met the young girl at a reception at the house of the second head of his department, and had fallen head over heels in love with her.

She was the daughter of a provincial tax collector, who had been dead several years. She and her mother came to live in Paris, where the latter, who made the acquaintance of some of the families in her neighborhood, hoped to find a husband for her daughter.

They had very moderate means, and were honorable, gentle, and quiet.

The young girl was a perfect type of the virtuous woman in whose hands every sensible young man dreams of one day intrusting his happiness. Her simple beauty had the charm of angelic modesty, and the imperceptible smile which constantly hovered about the lips seemed to be the reflection of a pure and lovely soul. Her praises resounded on every side. People never tired of repeating: “Happy the man who wins her love! He could not find a better wife.”

Monsieur Lantin, then chief clerk in the Department of the Interior, enjoyed a snug little salary of three thousand five hundred francs, and he proposed to this model young girl, and was accepted.

He was unspeakably happy with her. She governed his household with such clever economy that they seemed to live in luxury. She lavished the most delicate attentions on her husband, coaxed and fondled him; and so great was her charm that six years after their marriage, Monsieur Lantin discovered that he loved his wife even more than during the first days of their honeymoon.

He found fault with only two of her tastes: Her love for the theatre, and her taste for imitation jewelry. Her friends (the wives of some petty officials) frequently procured for her a box at the theatre, often for the first representations of the new plays; and her husband was obliged to accompany her, whether he wished it or not, to these entertainments which bored him excessively after his day’s work at the office.

After a time, Monsieur Lantin begged his wife to request some lady of her acquaintance to accompany her, and to bring her home after the theatre. She opposed this arrangement, at first; but, after much persuasion, finally consented, to the infinite delight of her husband.

Now, with her love for the theatre, came also the desire for ornaments. Her costumes remained as before, simple, in good taste, and always modest; but she soon began to adorn her ears with huge rhinestones, which glittered and sparkled like real diamonds. Around her neck she wore strings of false pearls, on her arms bracelets of imitation gold, and combs set with glass jewels.

Her husband frequently remonstrated with her, saying:

“My dear, as you cannot afford to buy real jewelry, you ought to appear adorned with your beauty and modesty alone, which are the rarest ornaments of your sex.”

But she would smile sweetly, and say:

“What can I do? I am so fond of jewelry. It is my only weakness. We cannot change our nature.”

Then she would wind the pearl necklace round her fingers, make the facets of the crystal gems sparkle, and say:

“Look! are they not lovely? One would swear they were real.”

Monsieur Lantin would then answer, smilingly:

“You have bohemian tastes, my dear.”

Sometimes, of an evening, when they were enjoying a tête-à-tête by the fireside, she would place on the tea table the morocco leather box containing the “trash,” as Monsieur Lantin called it. She would examine the false gems with a passionate attention, as though they imparted some deep and secret joy; and she often persisted in passing a necklace around her husband’s neck, and, laughing heartily, would exclaim: “How droll you look!” Then she would throw herself into his arms, and kiss him affectionately.

One evening, in winter, she had been to the opera, and returned home chilled through and through. The next morning she coughed, and eight days later she died of inflammation of the lungs.

Monsieur Lantin’s despair was so great that his hair became white in one month. He wept unceasingly; his heart was broken as he remembered her smile, her voice, every charm of his dead wife.

Time did not assuage his grief. Often, during office hours, while his colleagues were discussing the topics of the day, his eyes would suddenly fill with tears, and he would give vent to his grief in heartrending sobs. Everything in his wife’s room remained as it was during her lifetime; all her furniture, even her clothing, being left as it was on the day of her death. Here he was wont to seclude himself daily and think of her who had been his treasure-the joy of his existence.

But life soon became a struggle. His income, which, in the hands of his wife, covered all household expenses, was now no longer sufficient for his own immediate wants; and he wondered how she could have managed to buy such excellent wine and the rare delicacies which he could no longer procure with his modest resources.

He incurred some debts, and was soon reduced to absolute poverty. One morning, finding himself without a cent in his pocket, he resolved to sell something, and immediately the thought occurred to him of disposing of his wife’s paste jewels, for he cherished in his heart a sort of rancor against these “deceptions,” which had always irritated him in the past. The very sight of them spoiled, somewhat, the memory of his lost darling.

To the last days of her life she had continued to make purchases, bringing home new gems almost every evening, and he turned them over some time before finally deciding to sell the heavy necklace, which she seemed to prefer, and which, he thought, ought to be worth about six or seven francs; for it was of very fine workmanship, though only imitation.

He put it in his pocket, and started out in search of what seemed a reliable jeweler’s shop. At length he found one, and went in, feeling a little ashamed to expose his misery, and also to offer such a worthless article for sale.

“Sir,” said he to the merchant, “I would like to know what this is worth.”

The man took the necklace, examined it, called his clerk, and made some remarks in an undertone; he then put the ornament back on the counter, and looked at it from a distance to judge of the effect.

Monsieur Lantin, annoyed at all these ceremonies, was on the point of saying: “Oh! I know well ‘enough it is not worth anything,” when the jeweler said: “Sir, that necklace is worth from twelve to fifteen thousand francs; but I could not buy it, unless you can tell me exactly where it came from.”

The widower opened his eyes wide and remained gaping, not comprehending the merchant’s meaning. Finally he stammered: “You say–are you sure?’ The other replied, drily: “You can try elsewhere and see if any one will offer you more. I consider it worth fifteen thousand at the most. Come back; here, if you cannot do better.”

Monsieur Lantin, beside himself with astonishment, took up the necklace and left the store. He wished time for reflection.

Once outside, he felt inclined to laugh, and said to himself: “The fool! Oh, the fool! Had I only taken him at his word! That jeweler cannot distinguish real diamonds from the imitation article.”

A few minutes after, he entered another store, in the Rue de la Paix. As soon as the proprietor glanced at the necklace, he cried out:

“Ah, parbleu! I know it well; it was bought here.”

Monsieur Lantin, greatly disturbed, asked:

“How much is it worth?”

“Well, I sold it for twenty thousand francs. I am willing to take it back for eighteen thousand, when you inform me, according to our legal formality, how it came to be in your possession.”

This time, Monsieur Lantin was dumfounded. He replied:

“But–but–examine it well. Until this moment I was under the impression that it was imitation.”

The jeweler asked:

“What is your name, sir?”

“Lantin–I am in the employ of the Minister of the Interior. I live at number sixteen Rue des Martyrs.”

The merchant looked through his books, found the entry, and said: “That necklace was sent to Madame Lantin’s address, sixteen Rue des Martyrs, July 20, 1876.”

The two men looked into each other’s eyes–the widower speechless with astonishment; the jeweler scenting a thief. The latter broke the silence.

“Will you leave this necklace here for twenty-four hours?” said he; “I will give you a receipt.”

Monsieur Lantin answered hastily: “Yes, certainly.” Then, putting the ticket in his pocket, he left the store.

He wandered aimlessly through the streets, his mind in a state of dreadful confusion. He tried to reason, to understand. His wife could not afford to purchase such a costly ornament. Certainly not.

But, then, it must have been a present!–a present!–a present, from whom? Why was it given her?

He stopped, and remained standing in the middle of the street. A horrible doubt entered his mind–She? Then, all the other jewels must have been presents, too! The earth seemed to tremble beneath him–the tree before him to be falling; he threw up his arms, and fell to the ground, unconscious. He recovered his senses in a pharmacy, into which the passers-by had borne him. He asked to be taken home, and, when he reached the house, he shut himself up in his room, and wept until nightfall. Finally, overcome with fatigue, he went to bed and fell into a heavy sleep.

The sun awoke him next morning, and he began to dress slowly to go to the office. It was hard to work after such shocks. He sent a letter to his employer, requesting to be excused. Then he remembered that he had to return to the jeweler’s. He did not like the idea; but he could not leave the necklace with that man. He dressed and went out.

It was a lovely day; a clear, blue sky smiled on the busy city below. Men of leisure were strolling about with their hands in their pockets.

Monsieur Lantin, observing them, said to himself: “The rich, indeed, are happy. With money it is possible to forget even the deepest sorrow. One can go where one pleases, and in travel find that distraction which is the surest cure for grief. Oh if I were only rich!”

He perceived that he was hungry, but his pocket was empty. He again remembered the necklace. Eighteen thousand francs! Eighteen thousand francs! What a sum!

He soon arrived in the Rue de la Paix, opposite the jeweler’s. Eighteen thousand francs! Twenty times he resolved to go in, but shame kept him back. He was hungry, however–very hungry–and not a cent in his pocket. He decided quickly, ran across the street, in order not to have time for reflection, and rushed into the store.

The proprietor immediately came forward, and politely offered him a chair; the clerks glanced at him knowingly.

“I have made inquiries, Monsieur Lantin,” said the jeweler, “and if you are still resolved to dispose of the gems, I am ready to pay you the price I offered.”

“Certainly, sir,” stammered Monsieur Lantin.

Whereupon the proprietor took from a drawer eighteen large bills, counted, and handed them to Monsieur Lantin, who signed a receipt; and, with trembling hand, put the money into his pocket.

As he was about to leave the store, he turned toward the merchant, who still wore the same knowing smile, and lowering his eyes, said:

“I have–I have other gems, which came from the same source. Will you buy them, also?”

The merchant bowed: “Certainly, sir.”

Monsieur Lantin said gravely: “I will bring them to you.” An hour later, he returned with the gems.

The large diamond earrings were worth twenty thousand francs; the bracelets, thirty-five thousand; the rings, sixteen thousand; a set of emeralds and sapphires, fourteen thousand; a gold chain with solitaire pendant, forty thousand–making the sum of one hundred and forty-three thousand francs.

The jeweler remarked, jokingly:

“There was a person who invested all her savings in precious stones.”

Monsieur Lantin replied, seriously:

“It is only another way of investing one’s money.”

That day he lunched at Voisin’s, and drank wine worth twenty francs a bottle. Then he hired a carriage and made a tour of the Bois. He gazed at the various turnouts with a kind of disdain, and could hardly refrain from crying out to the occupants:

“I, too, am rich!–I am worth two hundred thousand francs.”

Suddenly he thought of his employer. He drove up to the bureau, and entered gaily, saying:

“Sir, I have come to resign my position. I have just inherited three hundred thousand francs.”

He shook hands with his former colleagues, and confided to them some of his projects for the future; he then went off to dine at the Cafe Anglais.

He seated himself beside a gentleman of aristocratic bearing; and, during the meal, informed the latter confidentially that he had just inherited a fortune of four hundred thousand francs.

For the first time in his life, he was not bored at the theatre, and spent the remainder of the night in a gay frolic.

Six months afterward, he married again. His second wife was a very virtuous woman; but had a violent temper. She caused him much sorrow.

EAC150 Course